Takenaka has been granted a patent for a subsurface soil purification method. The method involves warming an activator liquid to a higher temperature than groundwater, injecting it into the soil through an injection well, and forcing air into the well from a lower position. This stimulates decomposer microorganisms to decompose contaminants in the soil. The patent also covers the simultaneous injection of the activator liquid and air. GlobalData’s report on Takenaka gives a 360-degree view of the company including its patenting strategy. Buy the report here.

Smarter leaders trust GlobalData

Report-cover

Premium Insights Takenaka Corp - Company Profile

Buy the Report

Premium Insights

The gold standard of business intelligence.

Find out more

According to GlobalData’s company profile on Takenaka, vibration supression devices was a key innovation area identified from patents. Takenaka's grant share as of June 2023 was 1%. Grant share is based on the ratio of number of grants to total number of patents.

Subsurface soil purification method using warm activator liquid and air

Source: United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). Credit: Takenaka Corp

A recently granted patent (Publication Number: US11679425B2) describes a subsurface soil purification method that aims to decompose contaminants in subsurface soil using a combination of warming, injecting activator liquids, and forcing air into the soil. The method involves warming an activator liquid to a higher temperature than the groundwater temperature and injecting it into the soil through an injection well. Simultaneously, air is forced into the injection well from a lower position. This process stimulates decomposer microorganisms that aid in the decomposition of contaminants.

The patent also mentions the inclusion of decomposer microorganisms in the activator liquid, further enhancing the decomposition process. Before implementing the warming, injecting, and forcing steps, a cleaning liquid is warmed to a higher temperature than the groundwater temperature. This cleaning liquid is then injected into the soil through the injection well, and the groundwater containing the dissolved contaminants is pumped into a water treatment unit from a separate water pumping well located away from the injection well.

The activator liquid mentioned in the patent consists of various components, including a hydrogen releasing agent, an organic substance, a pH adjuster, micronutrients, and trace elements. These components act as activator agents, aiding in the decomposition of contaminants in the subsurface soil.

Additionally, the patent describes an alternative subsurface soil purification method that involves warming a purification liquid to a higher temperature than the groundwater temperature and injecting it into the soil through an injection well. Similar to the previous method, air is forced into the injection well from a lower position. The purification liquid can include hydrogen peroxide or an iron-based slurry as purification agents.

Overall, this granted patent presents innovative methods for subsurface soil purification by utilizing activator liquids, air infusion, and warming techniques. These methods aim to stimulate decomposer microorganisms and enhance the decomposition of contaminants in subsurface soil. The inclusion of specific activator agents and purification agents further improves the effectiveness of the purification process.

To know more about GlobalData’s detailed insights on Takenaka, buy the report here.

Premium Insights

From

The gold standard of business intelligence.

Blending expert knowledge with cutting-edge technology, GlobalData’s unrivalled proprietary data will enable you to decode what’s happening in your market. You can make better informed decisions and gain a future-proof advantage over your competitors.

GlobalData

GlobalData, the leading provider of industry intelligence, provided the underlying data, research, and analysis used to produce this article.

GlobalData Patent Analytics tracks bibliographic data, legal events data, point in time patent ownerships, and backward and forward citations from global patenting offices. Textual analysis and official patent classifications are used to group patents into key thematic areas and link them to specific companies across the world’s largest industries.