Strabag wins contract for Phase 2 of Toronto wastewater treatment plant

WCN Editorial Team 19 Nov 2019 NORTH AMERICA ENERGY & UTILITIES

Strabag Group’s Canadian subsidiary has secured a contract from the City of Toronto for the second phase of the Ashbridges Bay Treatment Plant Integrated Pumping Station.

The C$120m ($90.7) Integrated Pumping Station will allow the underground transport of wastewater to the Ashbridges Bay Wastewater Treatment Plant.

Strabag project manager Simon Köck said: “The pumping station is part of a larger infrastructure programme aimed at increasing wastewater capacity in the event of heavy rain and so improve the water quality of Toronto’s waterways and Lake Ontario.”

The main part of the project involves the construction of two large-scale shafts, one which is 68m deep with a diameter of 27m and the second which is 27m deep with a diameter of 32m. Shafts with a total length of 153m, including five smaller shafts, will be built.

The shafts will be linked to feeder tunnels with a total length of 445m, with a rock tunnel section along with a parallel pressure pipe in an open cut close to the surface.

The pumping station for the city of Toronto is part of a 14-year history of Strabag in Canada.

Strabag CEO Thomas Birtel said: “Our most prominent reference project in tunnelling must certainly be the Niagara Tunnel, a 10.1 km long water diversion tunnel with a diameter of 14.4 m, built using one of the world’s largest hard rock tunnel boring machines.”

The Ashbridges Bay Wastewater Treatment Plant is Toronto’s main sewage treatment facility and the second largest such plant in Canada, after Montreal’s Jean-R. Marcotte facility.

One of four plants serving the city of Toronto, the Ashbridges Bay Wastewater Treatment Plant treats wastewater produced by nearly 1.4 million of the city’s residents and has a rating capacity of 818,000m³ per day. Until 1999, it was officially called the Main Treatment Plant.

Located on the shore of Lake Ontario at the foot of Leslie Street at Ashbridge’s Bay, it was built in 1910. Prior to this, Toronto’s sewage directly flowed into Lake Ontario.

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Image: The pumping station will be built on the site of the Ashbridges Bay Wastewater Treatment Plant in the City of Toronto. Photo: Courtesy of Strabag.

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